Working Films uses documentaries to advance social justice and environmental protection.

Recognizing the power of film to inspire, we use documentaries to increase civic engagement and shift culture at the local, state, and national level. We offer funding and in-kind support to underrepresented filmmakers. And, we share our learning and foster dialogue to further the field of documentary for change. We lead conversations and trainings with nonprofits to ensure that nonfiction media is increasingly embraced as a critical resource in their strategies for social change.

Our work is made possible with generous support from the Arthur M. Blank Family Foundation, Ford Foundation, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, Kendeda Fund, Perspective Fund, Putnam Foundation, Southern Partners Fund, the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation, and individual donors.

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STAFF

Andy Myers
Senior Campaign Coordinator

Andy Myers

Andy Myers (pronoun: he) joined Working Films in 2011 and now serves as Senior Campaign Coordinator. A longtime proponent of connecting film with activism, he has led the development and implementation of Working Films' state based organizing with film, including the Coal Ash Stories, Fracking Stories, You Are Here, and Shore Stories campaigns. Andy facilitates dozens of partnerships between local, state, regional, and national partners using documentary to advance their goals for social and environmental justice. He also appreciates music's revolutionary role throughout history and currently plays saxophone in the Asheville-based radical marching band Brass Your Heart.
Hannah Hearn
Impact Coordinator

Hannah Hearn

Hannah Hearn (pronoun: she) is the Impact Coordinator for Working Films. She holds a B.A in Film Studies and a Minor in Entrepreneurship from the University of North Carolina Wilmington. Most recently, she was the Managing Director of Visions Film Festival & Conference and the Sound Mixer for the feature-length documentary “Dead in the Water” - a film that exposes the harmful practices of factory farms in eastern NC. In her current role, she is dedicated to coordinating impactful documentary film campaigns both locally and nationally in order to mobilize communities to create a healthy, fair, and equitable world.
Gerry Leonard
Impact Coordinator

Gerry Leonard

Gerry (pronoun: he) is the Impact Coordinator for Working Films. He was born in Jakarta, Indonesia, raised in Richmond, VA, and is currently based in Asheville, NC. Gerry brings into the field of narrative shift and media-for-social-change a background in community organizing, blending his experience in grassroots movement building and policy advocacy towards collective action and liberation. Before joining the Working Films team, Gerry has worked on issues of food access, animal welfare, voting rights and police accountability. His leadership on a number of coalitions and boards have led to improvements in policies to reduce racial profiling within the criminal justice system and collaborative funding opportunities for equitable and just community leadership. When not working, you can find him riding around town on his orange scooter and hosting a free form music show on Asheville FM 103.3 called Sound Hive.
Stephanie Avery Taylor
Operations and Finance Administrator

Stephanie Avery Taylor

Stephanie Avery Taylor (pronoun: she) is Working Films’ Operations and Finance Administrator.

Stephanie has an extensive background in racial justice and environmental education. She was a 2009 honoree of the National Women's History Project for the Leave No Trace Master Educator training and Eco-Camps she started, which inspire children to become good stewards of the land. Stephanie has served as a board member of the Cucalorus Film Festival and co-hosted the community Racial Rewind film series which focused on racial tensions throughout history and sparked involvement from participants to be active members of society for improved race relations. As the former Racial Justice director at the YWCA she worked with other local organizers to bring an inventive education series, The History of Wilmington in Black and White. Her previous experience as a business office manager gives her a unique and valuable skill set for managing Working Films’ administrative needs.
Sara Zia Ebrahimi
Development Manager

Sara Zia Ebrahimi

Sara Zia Ebrahimi (pronoun: she) is Working Films' Development Manager. She is a cultural worker based out of Philadelphia with almost 20 years of experience in film and video production, curation and event production, and supporting artists in community-based projects. Her previous positions have included working as the Program Director at the Leeway Foundation, a Community Engagement Coordinator for Independent Television Service's (ITVS) Community Cinema program and as the Development and Communications Director at Bread & Roses Community Fund. She describes her cultural heritage as kebab + grits + kale: born in Iran and raised in the US South by hippies. When not working, she can be found reading and watching science fiction stories or battling dragons with her partner and a young warrior princess.
Anna Lee
Co-Director

Anna Lee

Anna Lee (pronoun: she) serves as the co-director of Working Films. Since joining Working Films in 2005, Anna has developed and coordinated audience engagement campaigns for numerous high profile films, consulted with hundreds of filmmakers, and presented trainings to nonprofits leaders, increasing their capacity to use film as a tool to movie the dial on critical issues. In her current role Anna leads the operations and financial management of Working Films and raises funds, while continuing to manage a small number of film campaigns.

Anna brings previous experience as an educator to Working Films, using her background in curriculum design to enhance Working Films' trainings for filmmakers and nonprofits. She directed the development and outreach of Working Films’ multi-media curriculum project, New Faces: Latinos in North Carolina.

Prior to joining Working Films, Anna was the Program Director at Amigos Internacional, a Latino advocacy and education center in Wilmington, NC. Anna. She taught first grade in a bilingual program in Phoenix, AZ for two years and spent a year living in Latin America, where she studied Spanish and taught English as a foreign language. Anna earned a Master of Education from Arizona State University and a B.A. in Sociology from Wake Forest University. Together with her husband Johnny, she’s raising two young sons.

Molly Murphy
Co-Director

Molly Murphy

Molly Murphy (pronoun: she) co-directs Working Films. In her nineteen year tenure, she has served in many roles. She has planned and directed national media engagement campaigns, facilitated partnerships and coordinated coalitions centered on the use of documentaries to enhance communication, reach beyond the choir, and make an impact on the issues of our time. Molly has designed and led dozens of trainings for filmmakers, grassroots organizations, and NGOs focused on using film and online media to effect change. At Working Films, she is responsible for overall organizational management, programmatic strategy, institutional partnerships, and fundraising.

CONSULTANTS

Alyce Myatt
Docs in Action Advisor

Alyce Myatt

Alyce Myatt’s career reflects the intersection of media, art, and philanthropy. Now a consultant, she counts among her recent clients the University of Baltimore, the Center for Digital Democracy, the Robert W. Deutsch Foundation, the Heinz Endowments, and the Maryland Institute College of Art. She has been the director of Media Arts for the National Endowment for the Arts and was the founding Executive Director of the funder affinity group, Grantmakers in Film + Electronic Media. She also served as a Program Officer for Media at the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and as Director of Children’s Programming and later Vice President of Programming at PBS. In addition to staff positions, periodically Alyce has been a consultant throughout her career. Among her past clients are the Annie E. Casey and Skillman Foundations, Council on Foundations, National Alliance for Media Arts + Culture, TVE Brasil, Scholastic, Simon & Schuster, WGBH, WNET, WNYC Radio, and Voqal. Alyce began her career producing for both adults and children with projects ranging from investigative reports to a children’s science series. Her production credits include the Smithsonian Institution, Nickelodeon, “3-2-1 Contact!,” and ABC's "20/20."

Alyce Myatt has served as a board director or advisor to Arts Engine, Auburn Media at the Center for Multi-faith Education, the Center for Rural Strategies, the Center for Media & Social Impact at American University, the Council on Foundations Technology Task Force, the Emerson College Alumni Association, Grantmakers in the Arts: Art & Social Change Working Group, the National Alliance of Media Arts and Culture and WITNESS.

Natalie Bullock Brown
StoryShift Strategist

Natalie Bullock Brown

Natalie Bullock Brown is the lead strategist of StoryShift, a program of Working Films committed to shifting the way stories are told to ensure accountable and authentic representation of the people and the places featured. She is currently directing a documentary exploring beauty standards and their impact on black women and girls. She is also a producer for award- winning filmmaker Byron Hurt’s upcoming PBS documentary, HAZING. Natalie is a contributor and guest for the monthly program #BackChannel, for which she provides pop culture critique along with Dr. Mark Anthony Neal of Duke University, on WUNC radio’s The State of Things, hosted by Frank Stasio. Natalie was an assistant professor in film and broadcast media at Saint Augustine’s University for nearly 12 years, has produced multi-part DVD series documenting the Freedom Summer 50th Anniversary Commemorative Conference, and the Student Non- Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC ) 50th Anniversary Commemorative Conference. For more than a decade, Natalie served as host of Black Issues Forum, a public affairs program on UNC-TV, North Carolina’s statewide public television network. Prior to joining Saint Augustine's University, Natalie maintained a freelance career, providing production, research, and rights clearance consultation for clients including Jazz at Lincoln Center, filmmaker Ken Burns and Florentine Films, media companies Jazz Video Networks and Dreamtime Entertainment, award-winning filmmaker Judith Helfand, and others. Before going freelance, Natalie served as a producer and reporter for UNC-TV. Before that, she worked for filmmaker Ken Burns in his New York production office, serving as an associate producer on Burns’ 10 part PBS series Jazz, and as a production coordinator on Burns’ and Lynn Novick’s Frank Lloyd Wright. Natalie holds a Master of Fine Arts in Film Production from Howard University, and a Bachelor of Arts degree in English from Northwestern University. She began her work in film as an apprentice editor at National Geographic Television. Natalie is a founding board member of Working Films, and joins our staff team after serving for more than a decade in that capacity.

BOARD

Keryl McCord
Chair

Keryl McCord

Ms. McCord is President and CEO of EQ, The Equity Quotient, a national training and organizational development firm dedicated to supporting nonprofits interested in becoming more just and equitable community partners, with equity, diversity, and inclusion as outcomes of their work. EQ’s expertise and its curriculum provide Dismantling Racism training for the field of arts and culture, grounded in an analysis of the history, policies, and practices of the field.

Keryl McCord is a veteran arts manager and administrator with forty years of experience in many facets of the arts. Her background includes managing director of two equity theater companies: Oakland Ensemble Theater Company, a five-hundred seat equity theater in downtown Oakland, CA, and Crossroads Theater Company, New Brunswick, NJ, the only black run LORT theater at the time, and the first such company to receive the Tony Award for Outstanding Regional Theater. Crossroads Theater Company also received 4 Tony nominations for It Ain’t Nothing But the Blues, transferring to Broadway in 1999.

Ms. McCord led the League of Chicago Theaters/ League of Chicago Theaters Foundation, leaving Chicago to take a post at the National Endowment for the Arts as Assistant Director of Theater Programs, and then Director of Theater Programs in 1991.

She served on the executive committee of the National Black Theater Summit on Golden Pond in 1998, convened by the late Pulitzer Prize winning playwright, August Wilson. She was a founding board member, and Senior Vice President of the African Grove Institute for the Arts (AGIA), Newark, NJ, of which Mr. Wilson served as chairman. She remained with AGIA until Mr. Wilson’s passing, when she then went on to serve as Director of Institutional Development for New Jersey Symphony Orchestra.

In December 2016, after more than seven years as Managing Director, she retired from Alternate ROOTS to launch EQ. ROOTS is a 40-year-old nationally recognized, regionally focused network and service organization for activist artists in the South. Ms. McCord was responsible for overall day-to-day management, including fundraising and development, shepherding the organization through a period of unprecedented growth.
She is an Advisor for the New England Foundation for the Arts, National Theater Project, and has served as a panelist for the Joyce Foundation, the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts, among others.

Additionally, Ms. McCord has served as a consultant for Dance USA’s Engaging Dance Audiences program, and for its new program, Dance Fellowships to Artists.

Keryl is chair of the board of Working Films, based in Wilmington, NC.

EQ has conducted Dismantling Racism training and workshops with organizations such as:
-League of Chicago Theaters, Chicago, IL;
-University of North Carolina School of the Arts, Winston-Salem NC;
-The New Jersey Theatre Alliance, Princeton, NJ;
-The High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA;
-League of American Orchestras, New York, NY;
-DePaul Theater School, Chicago, IL;
-Fractured Atlas, New York, NY.,
-National New Play Network, Washington, D.C.,
-New England Foundation for the Arts, Boston, MA;
-Alternate ROOTS, Atlanta, GA;
-United Scenic Artists 829, New York, New York;
-Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company, Washington, DC
-Dance USA, Washington, DC
-University of Alabama, Department of Theatre and Dance

Felix Endara
Vice Chair

Felix Endara

Ecuadorian filmmaker Felix Endara claims a long and consistent track record of producing innovative, thought-provoking media that has screened at prestigious film festivals such as Berlinale, DOC NYC, and Mill Valley. Topics he has covered have ranged from the preservation of LGBT historical spaces to portrayals of activists who challenge prejudice and violence. His work as an independent programmer and arts administrator draw on his values to champion art that functions as a catalyst for social change.
Angel Dozier
Board Member

Angel Dozier

Angel Iset Dozier is an activist, creative, educator and founder of Be Connected Durham, a community initiative connecting audiences, addressing disparities, fostering equity, and bridging access gaps through the arts, culture, music, and politics. She is a hip hop film and music lover and has used yoga, dance, literature, and golden era hip hop, specifically, to drive her work as a world languages instructor and curriculum specialist within public, private and Montessori school systems.

Through Be Connected Durham, Angel has emerged as an urban visionary, championing community initiatives that connect organizations like Duke Performances, Carolina Performing Arts, Airolina Young Aviators, SheaMoisture, and more, to their authentically diverse target audiences. Each of Be Connected Durham’s projects serve as campaigns to affect positive change for marginalized, yet highly capable and valuable contributors to our society.
Betty Yu
Board Member

Betty Yu

Betty Yu is a multimedia artist, filmmaker, educator, and activist born and raised in NYC to Chinese immigrant parents. Ms. Yu integrates documentary film, new media platforms, and community-infused approaches into her practice, and she is a co-founder Chinatown Art Brigade, a cultural collective using art to advance anti-gentrification organizing. Ms. Yu has been awarded artist residencies and Fellowships with institutions such as the Laundromat Project, International Studio & Curatorial Program, the Intercultural Leadership Institute, and SPACE at Ryder Farm. Her work has been presented at the Directors Guild of America, Brooklyn Museum, Margaret Mead Film and Video Festival, Tribeca Film Festival's Interactive Showcase, The Eastman Kodak Museum, and the 2019 BRIC Biennial; and in 2018 she had a solo exhibition at Open Source Gallery in New York. In 2017 Ms. Yu won the Aronson Journalism for Social Justice Award for her film Three Tours about U.S. veterans returning home from war in Iraq, and their journey to overcome PTSD. She holds a BFA from NYU's Tisch School of the Arts and a MFA from Hunter College, and currently teaches video, social practice, art and activism at Pratt Institute, John Jay College, and The New School, in addition to 20 her years of community, media justice, and labor organizing work.
Caty Borum Chattoo
Board Member

Caty Borum Chatoo

Caty Borum Chattoo is Director of the Center for Media & Social Impact (CMSI), an innovation lab and research center at American University that creates, showcases and studies media designed for social change; and Executive in Residence at the American University School of Communication in Washington, D.C. She is an award-winning communication strategist and documentary film/TV producer working at the intersection of social-change communication, research, documentary and entertainment storytelling.

Borum Chattoo’s social-change storytelling, strategy and research work has been featured in USA Today, NPR, Businessweek, The Huffington Post, and PBS MediaShift, and her social justice documentaries have aired internationally and nationally on Netflix, the Sundance Channel, Pivot, NDTV (India), PBS World, Link TV, KCET, DirectTV and theatrically. She has produced two documentary feature films (Wal-Mart: The High Cost of Low Price and The After Party), a TV documentary and transmedia series (Stand Up Planet, starring Hasan Minhaj from “The Daily Show”), a multi-part documentary TV series focused on global poverty (ViewChange), a seven-part environmental justice documentary TV series (Sierra Club Chronicles), and PSA campaigns designed for social change on issues ranging from global poverty to climate change to HIV. At CMSI, her current research, creative and strategy work focuses on audience effects of documentary storytelling, nonfiction industry race and gender diversity, audience effects of entertainment storytelling across platforms, and the role of comedy in social justice.

Previously, she was senior vice president in the social marketing practice group at FleishmanHillard International Communications in Washington, D.C., focused on social-change programs. In Los Angeles, she was a longtime collaborator with legendary TV producer and philanthropist/activist Norman Lear as a founding director of Declare Yourself, a national youth civic engagement organization; and special projects director & senior producer at the USC Norman Lear Center, a research and public policy center that examines the social impact of entertainment on society. She also served as the program officer in the Kaiser Family Foundation’s Entertainment Media & Public Health program; project director at the Center for Media Education; and fellow in civic journalism at The Philadelphia Inquirer.

Borum Chattoo holds an M.A. in Communication from the University of Pennsylvania (The Annenberg School for Communication), and a B.A. in Communication Studies (summa cum laude, In Honors, Phi Beta Kappa) from Virginia Tech.
Ellen Bollinger
Board Member

Ellen Bollinger

Ellen Bollinger consults for reality-respecting news organizations to drive advertising revenue, writes marketing materials and, with her husband, sells advertising and produces events for a cannabis news organization, based in California.

Undergraduate work at New College in Sarasota, FL resulted in a degree in Psychological Anthropology with a Theater Minor. An entry level job with a theatrical PR firm in the Sardi’s building on West 44th Street gave her a good understanding of ‘earned’ media and a permanent love for the theater and media crowd who convened at the second-floor bar. Those contacts soon resulted in her sales position with The NYT where, over the span of a decade, she went on to win two Publishers Award for new business development and MVP trophies for their Co-Ed softball championship team.

During sixteen years as VP Advertising with The Nation magazine, Ellen worked with documentary filmmakers and distributors to build awareness and attendance for their films, often attending Sundance, Woodstock Film Festival and Docs NYC.

Additionally, Ellen serves on the Board of a Friends Group of the Sandy Hook Unit of Gateway National Recreation Area to support the National Park Service in conservation of endangered species, environmental protections and cultural awareness of historic sites in northeastern Monmouth County, NJ as well as Communications Director of a local chapter of Indivisible.

Her husband is a writer and creator of healthy cocktails and their son works for AmeriCorps in New Orleans on coastal restoration and sustainable flora and fauna.
Esther Cassidy
Board Member

Esther Cassidy

Esther Cassidy is an independent documentary producer and director, who has also joined the producing teams of acclaimed filmmakers. The films she has worked on focus on social justice and human rights including: U.S. intervention in El Salvador, opposition to the death penalty, civil rights, women's rights, and workers' right to strike and safety on the job. She is also a nonprofit development professional who has raised millions of dollars for arts and service organizations in New York City provide artistic trainings and supportive services to disadvantaged youth, at-risk LGBTQ youth, and low-income media artists from diverse ethnic and cultural communities.
Kim Pevia
Board Member

Kim Pevia

Kim Pevia is an experienced life strategist, an engaging keynote speaker, and a skilled workshop facilitator. Her workshops are experiential and transformational. She specializes in identifying the issues that keep us stuck and addresses them by developing a personalized toolbox to help us hurdle over them. Her favorite work is done in circles. Her favorite topics include Emotional intelligence, Gifts of Conflict, Impacts of Historical Trauma, Cultural Healing, Innocuous Nature of Fear, most of which she includes in Race, Equity and Inclusion work. Born and educated in Baltimore, MD she currently lives in Robeson County, NC where her roots run deep as a member of the Lumbee Tribe.


She serves on many local, state and national boards that support community activism and local economy through arts, food, culture and tourism. She recently served as Chair of the Board of Alternate Roots. In 2015 she founded Artist Market-Pembroke, providing retail opportunities for local and regional artists in southeast North Carolina. Her love of community and films is expressed as the curator of the annual Lumbee Film Festival (along with Cucalorus) and the quarterly CommUnity Cinema (in partnership with Working Films). She expresses her creativity as a writer and workshop/training facilitator.
Kimberly McLaughlin-Smith
Board Member

Kimberly McLaughlin-Smith

Director Inclusion and Diversity Learning Development Specialist, founder of Pearl Girls Academy, Inc. Radio Personality and Community Advocate, for all things diverse, Kimberly McLaughlin-Smith is no newcomer to motivational programming for both young people and adults.

Her One Race® program for children in grades K-5 has earned the admiration of school administrators for several years. One Race® offers an interactive and thought-provoking view of a day-in-the-life of children around the world. The program employs music, authentic artifacts and literature, and takes students on an imaginary worldwide trip to celebrate what distinguishes them from their neighbors, while revealing numerous similarities.

Pearl Girls Academy, a self-esteem program for girls, evolved from Kimberly’s own experiences of raising a teenage girl. As often as she could, Kimberly researched statistics on preteen and teen girl violence, body image, dating, and other issues. She became a certified facilitator for "Safe Dates," a program designed to help curb domestic violence among young daters. And, as school violence and gang influences became evident, Kimberly coordinated a forum entitled Youth Violence in Our Community, which has now become an annual event.

Her continued research led to an understanding of the key issues most girls face, while also recognizing that the skills to face these issues were sorely lacking. Pearl Girls Academy is the result of that work. When it was first offered to summer camps in 2005, the response was immediately positive and productive. The next school year, Murray Middle School asked Kimberly to bring the program in as an enrichment organization for selected girls. By the following school year, word of the program had spread. Eventually every middle school in New Hanover County, requested to have Pearl Girls Academy on campus.

Kimberly has also served as the Racial Justice Director of the YWCA of the Lower Cape Fear. In her time with the organization, developed and implemented programs and created alliances throughout the community. The end goal as always was to aid in establishing common ground, among people of different ethnic backgrounds. Kimberly designed the YWCA Cultural Competency Training workshops, utilized in those times throughout the county. She currently serves as the UNC Wilmington Inclusion and Diversity Learning Development Specialist. Her role is based in the Human Resources

Kimberly was named Woman of the Year by the New Hanover County Human Relations Commission. She has served on various boards for non-profit organizations within the community. Kimberly is also the “Night Nurse,” a radio personality on Coastal Carolina’s Modern Rock 98.7, where she continues to advocate cross cultural understanding through reggae and world music.
Lisa Kleiner Chanoff
Board Member

Lisa Kleiner Chanoff

Lisa Kleiner Chanoff is co-founder of Catapult Film Fund. Lisa founded Catapult Film Fund, along with filmmaker Bonni Cohen, in order to fill a gap in the documentary funding landscape for development support and to enable important and moving documentary films to get off the ground. Lisa is an investor and philanthropist, with a passion for early venture support. She has a long history of involvement in education and the arts, as well as health and poverty issues.

In addition to her involvement with Catapult films, Lisa is a Co-Executive Producer of FRUITVALE STATION, and an Executive Producer of the documentary WATCHERS OF THE SKY.
Lisa has a J.D. from University of California, Hastings College of the Law and practiced law in San Francisco and with the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Department of Justice in Washington D.C. After leaving law practice, Lisa received a master’s degree in Museum Studies and worked with museums in the San Francisco bay area, including the Contemporary Jewish Museum, designing exhibitions and education programs.

Lisa assists several non-profits in an advisory capacity, and serves on the boards of Working Films and the San Francisco Film Society.

Lisa has three children and lives in San Francisco with her husband Matt.
Malaika Mose
Board Member

Malaika Mose

Malaika (Paquiot) Mose splits her times between her 2 loves: film and tech. To this end, she is a Digital Strategist with ARRAY, formerly known as African American Film Festival Releasing Movement (AFFRM), founded by the director of the Oscar-nominated film SELMA: Ava DuVernay. Malaika's led a group of 60 volunteers in the digital promotion of 13 out of ARRAY's 14 releases and will be working on their 15th acquisition: NAMOUR.

Vice-President of Product Management at a Wilmington, NC-based cloud banking startup, she has been in the software industry for 14 years during which time she has won the National Women of Color Technology Award.

She merges the tech and film worlds by writing on online film distribution and crowdfunding and has done so for Focal Press' Mastering Film blog, Filmmaker Magazine's blog and her own blog Beyond the Box Office. Up since 2009, it focuses on innovative ways for filmmakers to distribute their films, including set-top boxes, streaming services and mobile apps.

An authority on online film distribution, Malaika has been invited to cover industry events like National Association of Broadcasters, and has covered events like NewTeeVee Live, The Conversation, IFP and Power to the Pixel’s CrossMedia Forum NYC, DIY Days and SXSW. When last she checked, she was listed 84 times on Twitter in such categories as filmmaking, film-video, IPTV, new movie distribution and her personal favorite: Awesomocity.

She is currently a member of the Sundance Institute and a former board member of the San Jose Multicultural Artists Guild.

Having got to know Working Films co-founder Robert West briefly in the year before his diagnosis, it is her great honor to lend her skills to advancing the mission of the organization through membership on its board.
Peter Miller
Board Member

Peter Miller

Peter Miller is an Emmy and Peabody-award winning filmmaker whose documentaries have screened in cinemas and on television throughout the world. Among his films are A.K.A. DOC POMUS, JEWS AND BASEBALL, SACCO AND VANZETTI, THE INTERNATIONALE (Oscar short list), and with Carlos Sandoval, A CLASS APART for PBS’s American Experience, now being adapted as a feature film executive produced by Eva Longoria. Peter co-directed ROBERT SHAW: MAN OF MANY VOICES, winner of three Emmy Awards, for PBS American Masters, and produced Ken Rosenberg’s BEDLAM, about serious mental illness, which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival, for PBS Independent Lens. He is currently collaborating with filmmakers Peggy Stern and Justin Schein on DO NO HARM, a documentary series for PBS about Palliative Care, and is directing and producing MARCELLA, a biography of the legendary food writer Marcella Hazan.

Peter has been a producer on numerous documentaries by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick, including the PBS series JAZZ, FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT, and THE WAR. He has served in producing roles on landmark documentaries including THE UPRISING OF ’34, PASSIN’ IT ON, the Academy Award-winning AMERICAN DREAM, and many other celebrated films. He works regularly as a script consultant, writer, and music supervisor. More about his work is at willowpondfilms.com
Tracy Rector
Board Member

Tracy Rector

Tracy Rector (Choctaw/Seminole) is a mixed-race filmmaker, curator, community organizer, and programmer. Currently, she is serving as the Managing Director of Storytelling at Nia Tero, a non-profit committed to supporting Indigenous governance and guardianship. She has directed and produced over 400 shorts and other films including the award-winning Teachings of the Tree People, March Point, Maiden of Deception Pass, and Ch'aak' S'aagi. She is in production on her sixth feature documentary Outta the Muck with support from ITVS. As an impact producer, Tracy served on the team for the Emmy Award winning feature documentary Dawnland, which premiered on Independent Lens’ 2018/19 season to 2.1 million viewers in its opening week. Her work has also been featured in National Geographic, imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival, Cannes Film Festival, Toronto International Film Festival, and the Smithsonian’s Museum of the American Indian.

Tracy is the co-founder of Longhouse Media, a non-profit focused on galvanizing Indigenous and local communities through film production. Since 2005, she has worked with over 50 tribal nations and helped train 3,000 young people. Tracy has received the National Association for Media Literacy Education Award, 2016 Stranger Genius Award, and the Horace Mann Award for her work in utilizing media for social justice. She is a Firelight Media Fellow, WGBH Producer Fellow, Sundance Institute Lab Fellow, and Tribeca All Access Grantee. Tracy’s first major museum installation opened in June 2018 at the Seattle Art Museum. Tracy serves as a Mize Foundation board member, senior programmer at the Seattle International Film Festival, and is in her second term as a Seattle Arts Commissioner. She is a mother of two young men.
Will Jenkins
Board Member

Will Jenkins

Will Jenkins has more than a decade of communications and policy experience at the White House, the Department of Health and Human Services, Congress and international nonprofit organizations. Over the years, he has also worked with many filmmakers and media producers on stories that engage policy issues.

During his time in the federal government, Will served as a spokesperson to local, national and foreign news outlets on a wide range of issues, including criminal justice reform, drug policy, immigration, public health and education. At the White House, he worked with filmmakers to plan interviews and events with the President and senior officials for documentaries airing on PBS/Frontline, MTV, Showtime and other outlets. He has planned high profile events and policy rollouts featured in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, USA TODAY and The Washington Post and managed appearances for government officials on Meet the Press, Morning Joe, 60 Minutes and The Colbert Report. As a legislative aide in Congress, he guided from introduction to enactment the first legislation to protect American military members from the health effects of toxic burn pits in Iraq and Afghanistan, which has been called this generation's Agent Orange.

As part of his work with media producers, he was Policy Director for the Impact Film Festival at the 2012 Republican and Democratic National Conventions, where he coordinated screening discussions with politicians, filmmakers, celebrities and reporters. In 2013, he developed the American Film Institute's first Political Bootcamp for Filmmakers. He has spoken about film and policymaking at South by Southwest, the Tribeca Film Festival, Good Pitch and the International Documentary Association. He is co-author of a report series on films and policymaking that published through American University in 2017 (http://cmsimpact.org/report/movies-go-washington-documentary-films-public-policy-united-states-vol-1/).

IN MEMORIAM

If you would like to make a donation in honor of Robert West, Working Films’ co-founder and longtime executive director who passed away in June 2013, please donate directly here to the Robert West Reel Engagement Fund. Like Robert, the work supported by the Fund will be creative and responsive to the needs and opportunities for social change.

Funds contributed to the Robert West Reel Engagement Fund will be used to honor Robert’s legacy and vision, and to support rapid response campaign development on timely environmental and social justice issues!